We offer accommodation in two houses, right next to each other.

6-person house(on the left side): 3 bedrooms, one has a double bed, the other rooms have two single beds. The house has a bathroom and a fully equipped kitchen. Outside you will find a patio with outdoor furniture and barbecue facilities.

7-person house(on the right side): 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. Patio with a hot tub, outdoor furniture and barbecue facilities.

Both houses have made-up beds, towels, cleaning agents and a hairdryer. Good duvets, pillows, bed sheets and beds.

Board

The nearest restaurant is located ar Eyvindará, about 800 m away. More restaurants and supermarkets are located in Egilsstaðir, 4 km away.

Service and recreation

During the summer there is a petting zoo next to the houses where you can view and pet lambs, calves, piglets, horses, chickens, ducks and cats. A horse rental called Galdrahestar is operated at the farm, offering guided tours for beginners and advanced riders. We offer helmets and riding gear for everybody and one guide per 3-4 guests.

Experience Icelandic farm life

What makes Finnsstaðir so unique is the fact that you are in the raw Icelandic countryside, yet only a short distance from the nearest town. At Finnsstaðir guests can experience a closeness to the farm animals and many enjoy taking an active part in their care by feeding them bottles and feed, petting and cuddling. There is also a rich birdlife in the moorland below the guesthouses. In springtime, the hosts offer walking tours where you can pick goose eggs and in the autumn, you can pick blueberries right next to the houses.

Closely connected to the Lagarfljót Wyrm

The Lagarfljót Wyrm is an Icelandic lake monster, purported to live in the lake Lagarfljót right next to Finnsstaðir. Sightings have been logged since 1345 and continue into the 21st century, including a 2012 video showing the creature swimming. According to folklore, a local girl was given a gold ring by her mother. She wanted to derive profit from the gold and was told that the best way to do so was to place the ring under a lungworm. She did so and put it on the top of linen chest for a few days, but then found that the worm had grown so large it had broken up the chest. Frightened, she threw both it and the chest into the lake, where the serpent continued to grow and terrorize the locals, spitting poison and killing people and animals. Two Finns were called in to destroy it and retrieve the gold. The Finns said they had managed to tie its head and tail to the bottom of the lake, right next to Finnsstaðir, which derives its name from the two Finns.